Livestock and Pet preparedness

From www.americanhumane.org/animals/programs/emergency-services/community-preparedness

Your pet needs you even more when disaster strikes

When disaster strikes a community, essential services like water are often unavailable. So what can you do to ensure your pet is cared for during and, especially after, a disaster?

Preparation for pets

  • Keep your pets’ vaccinations up-to-date.
  • Know where your pets can go whether it’s a friend or family member, pet-friendly hotel, animal shelter, or boarding facility.
  • Place your contact information, including the name of an out-of-state contact on your pets’ ID tags, microchip registrations, and licenses.
  • Prepare an emergency kit of leashes, collars, extra ID tags, water, food, medications, health records, and photos to prove ownership.
  • Have on hand portable carriers large enough for your pets to stand and turn around in.
  • Prepare a first-aid kit, including your vet contact information and an authorization to treat your pets.
  • Gather any relief plans developed by your local Red Cross chapter; emergency management office; or police, fire, health, wildlife and agriculture departments so you know where to turn for specific resources.

Preparation for livestock

  • Post emergency contact numbers at your barn or on your pasture fence.
  • Have sufficient transportation available for all your livestock or know where to obtain it. Train your livestock how to board the vehicles.
  • Create a list of neighbors within a 100-mile radius of your home who would be willing to board your livestock if you are forced to evacuate.
  • Form agreements with neighboring ranches and farms to help each other with disaster preparation and evacuations.
  • Know organizations in your area that are prepared to rescue and house displaced livestock.
  • Involve your family and neighbors in establishing an evacuation plan for animals in barns and outlying buildings.
  • Have a supply of feed at a separate location, which could be air-dropped if the animals become stranded.
  • Make up a kit with leads, halters, equine and bovine first aid kits, quieting hoods for easy transport, and water.
  • Keep photos and a copy of your ownership papers or brands with you at all times in case you are separated from your livestock.

Vashon Animal Resources