COVID-19 Resources

Vashon’s COVID response & recovery efforts moved to standby/monitoring mode at the end of June. See the info cards below for current, accurate pandemic information. (Older, outdated content has been moved to Old Home page and Old Resource Center if you need.)

Friday, May 20:  VashonBePrepared COVID Update (web link • newsletter version):

One Million and Five • Vashon COVID Monitoring: The Flat Surge Continues • Now It’s BA.2.12.1 • Developments: Kid Boosters, COVID/Flu Test 
You Can Take Control: Be Protected & Be Prepared • Latest Vashon COVID Statistics

Mas de un Millón  • Actualización de COVID en Vashon: La Oleada Continúa Presente y Aplanada  • Ahora es BA.2.12.1
Vacunas de Refuerzo para Niños, Pruebas combinada para COVID/Influenza • Usted puede tomar el Control:  Esté protegido y Esté Preparado
Últimas Estadisticas de COVID en Vashon

 

I Need a Vaccination
COVID Vaccine

COVID-19 vaccinations are available free on the island at Vashon Pharmacy and Sea Mar at Sunrise Ridge, as well as other locations off-island.

I Need a COVID Test
...

COVID-19 testing is available on and off of Vashon for people with symptoms or exposures, or if testing is needed for jobs or travel.

I Need Information

Current information about the pandemic, including data dashboards, vaccine resources, and much more, is available here via links to the King and Pierce Counties and Washington State public health departments, the CDC website and more.

I Need Help
Resources Available

Resources are available for the Vashon community and businesses still affected by the pandemic. Several local organizations and the Chamber of Commerce can help.

What Happened

View every Situation Report from the COVID-19 emergency activation, along with images, an archive history timeline and some writings inspired by the moment.

Get Alerts
...

Sign up for a variety of alert services, including Voice Of Vashon's, and other sources of reliable information.

Get Prepared

Does your family & business have a communications plan? That is just one of a number of easy steps to enhance your safety & preparedness for any incident. Learn more by looking at our preparation information.

About Us
...

VashonBePrepared is a coalition of some 10 disaster preparedness organizations on Vashon-Maury Island in Washington's Puget Sound region. Incorporated in 2007 we now work closely under Vashon Fire, King County of Emergency Management and support our partners' nearly 400 active volunteers.

I Want to Help Out

VashonBePrepared provides training and educational opportunities to keep the island community prepared for the next emergency. See opportunities to get involved or donate.

Latest Updates

Supervolcano Eruptions More Likely, as they can be Triggered by Melt Buoyancy

Jan 6

Written by:
1/6/2014 1:46 PM  RssIcon

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

A graph showing the relationship between eruption volume and time between eruptions, using the models presented in Carrichi and others (2014). Notice how for buoyancy-driven eruptions (in blue), the time between eruptions doesn’t vary much across a wide range of volumes. Image: Figure 3 from Caricchi and others (2014), Nature Geoscience.

The study’s upshot is that Yellowstone Caldera (and the other 20+ supervolcano sites) are more likely than previously thought to explode without the aid of an earthquake. A big one could drastically lower global temperatures for years. Fortunately it sounds like we’ll still get ten years advance warning.

Ground-breaking work sheds new light on volcanic activity

Factors determining the frequency and magnitude of volcanic phenomena have been uncovered by an international team of researchers.

Experts from the Universities of Geneva, Bristol and Savoie carried out over 1.2 million simulations to establish the conditions in which volcanic eruptions of different sizes occur.

The team used numerical modeling and statistical techniques to identify the circumstances that control the frequency of volcanic activity and the amount of magma that will be released.

The researchers, including Professor Jon Blundy and Dr. Catherine Annen from Bristol University's School of Earth Sciences, showed how different size eruptions have different causes. Small, frequent eruptions are known to be triggered by a process called magma replenishment, which stresses the walls around a magma chamber to breaking point. However, the new research shows that larger, less frequent eruptions are caused by a different phenomenon known as magma buoyancy, driven by slow accumulation of low-density magma beneath a volcano.

Predictions of the scale of the largest possible volcanic eruption on earth have been made using this new insight. This is the first time scientists have been able to establish a physical link between the frequency and magnitude of volcanic eruptions and their findings will be published today in the journal Nature Geoscience.

"We estimate that a magma chamber can contain a maximum of 35,000 km3 of eruptible magma. Of this, around 10 per cent is released during a super-eruption, which means that the largest eruption could release approximately 3,500 km3 of magma", explained lead researcher Luca Caricchi, assistant professor at the Section of Earth and Environmental Sciences at the University of Geneva and ex-research fellow at the University of Bristol.

Volcanic eruptions may be frequent yet their size is notoriously hard to predict. For example, the Stromboli volcano in Italy ejects magma every ten minutes and would take two days to fill an Olympic swimming pool. However, the last super-eruption of a volcano, which occurred over 70,000 years ago, spewed out enough magma to fill a billion swimming pools.

This new research identifies the main physical factors involved in determining the frequency and size of eruptions and is essential to understanding phenomena that effect human life, such as the 2010 ash cloud caused by the eruption of Eyjafallajökull in Iceland.

Professor Jon Blundy said: "Some volcanoes ooze modest quantities of magma at regular intervals, whereas others blow their tops in infrequent super-eruptions. Understanding what controls these different types of behavior is a fundamental geological question.

"Our work shows that this behavior results from interplay between the rate at which magma is supplied to the shallow crust underneath a volcano and the strength of the crust itself. Very large eruptions require just the right (or wrong!) combination of magma supply and crustal strength."

-- www.eurekalert.org/pub_releases/2014-01/uob-gws010314.php

More:

Tags:
Categories:
Location: Blogs Parent Separator John's Blog